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Steve Sands Says Biggest Change For TV Is Smaller Crews

“Sands said that even in a smaller venue, even with a small scale event like TaylorMade Driving Relief, the lack of fans is hard to ignore.”

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Steve Sands was on the course Sunday for NBC’s presentation of the TaylorMade Driving Relief skins game. On Monday, the reporter joined colleague Mike Tirico on NBCSN’s Lunch Talk Live to talk about the experience.

Sands, who covers golf for NBC Sports and GOLF Channel, says that he wasn’t surprised that TaylorMade and Rory McIlroy, Dustin Johnson, Rickie Fowler and Matthew Wolff, all of whom are sponsored by the company, staged an event to raise money for charity.

“No other organization raises more money than the PGA TOUR, and the players give their time. It’s what they do and part of the DNA of the sport.”

As for the event itself, Sands said that one thing he did not anticipate effecting him was the smaller crew that worked behind the scenes of the broadcast. “Only 28 people on the TV side,” he told Tirico, noting that usually the broadcast crew is upwards of 100 people.

What do other broadcasters need to know as sports prepare to return? Sands said that even in a smaller venue, even with a small scale event like TaylorMade Driving Relief, the lack of fans is hard to ignore.

“It was odd in a sense that it was quiet. When you’re going to a professional sporting event, you are there to see people even if it is a charity event. I think it’s going to be a really big deal to not have fans when the PGA TOUR and sports return.”

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ESPN, FOX Executives Floated As Next Big Ten Commissioner

“Here’s the problem with getting a TV executive right now is that their media deal is done for long-term.”

Jordan Bondurant

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Last week it was announced that Big Ten commissioner Kevin Warren would be departing for a job with the Chicago Bears, and the speculation on a replacement has started.

With the conference last year inking a multi-billion dollar media rights deal with CBS, NBC and FOX, it’s believed that a TV executive could be considered one of the top candidates.

But on The Marchand and Ourand Sports Media Podcast, Sports Business Journal’s John Ourand thought that might not be the play even though some names in various leadership positions have been floated around.

“Here’s the problem with getting a TV executive right now is that their media deal is done for long-term,” Ourand said. “So the names that consistently come up – Burke Magnus who has a big job at ESPN now, but he’s also the guy who launched the ACC Network, the SEC Network, he cut his teeth on ESPNU. He’s someone that knows, understands and loves the college game and somebody who would be great in that position I think.”

Ourand also wondered if FOX Sports president Mark Silverman would also be considered. But Ourand then thought about some of the other conference commissioners out there who could potentially throw their names in the running.

ACC commissioner Jim Phillips came to mind for Ourand.

“He’s cut his teeth as commissioner a the ACC,” he said. “Is this something that he could be interested in? I think that’s worthy of taking a look at.”

But Ourand did say when you look at conferences like the Pac-12, Big 12 and the Big Ten, often the name that emerges is someone that wasn’t necessarily grown in college sports.

“George Kliavkoff wasn’t on anybody’s list. He just sort of came out from nowhere,” Ourand said. “Brett Yormark at the Big 12. Nobody would’ve predicted that he would’ve gone in there. So the traditional route of you need to be an AD or you need to be in sort of college sports to rise up to commissioner, that’s been thrown on its head by the Pac-12 and the Big 12.”

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Lisa Guerrero Details Fraught Relationship With Fred Guadelli, Sports Radio in New Book

“I was trying to be Barbara Walters while all these radio sports-show guys were trying to be the next Howard Stern.”

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Former Monday Night Football sideline reporter Lisa Guerrero reached the pinnacle of her sports media journey in 2003-04, but her dream was quickly derailed.

Ahead of the release of her new memoir called Warrior, My Path to Being Brave, Guerrero told PEOPLE Magazine that she entered in a time where women in sports still weren’t taken seriously.

“I was trying to be Barbara Walters while all these radio sports-show guys were trying to be the next Howard Stern,” Guerrero said. “They did it for sport — just eviscerating me constantly and talking about my breasts and sexual acts and how I probably was able to get all these big athletes to talk to me.”

“To them, I was the worst,” an excerpt from the book reads. “I was everything that was wrong with sports. I alone had set women back decades. They’d attack my clothes, hair (why was it so long?), even my nail polish (how dare I wear red — I must be a whore!).”

Guerrero recalled in the book her often tumultuous relationship with MNF executive producer Fred Guadelli. She recalled getting an earful after she made a mistake during an interview on her MNF debut.

“Freddie was still yelling into my IFB earpiece as I walked off the field to the production truck, feeling sick, my hands shaking,” Guerrero wrote. “I opened the door and braced myself. Freddie’s head snapped toward me as he demanded an explanation for my mistake. Freddie is a short guy. But at that moment, he reminded me of a hulking ‘roided-out linebacker about to deliver a vicious hit.”

She added that having Guadelli being so harsh on her took its toll on her mental health.

“Freddie’s criticisms obliterated all other [aspects] of my life — a great job, lots of money, and a gorgeous fiancé,” she wrote. “But I was thinking, Who decides to get married when they’re also considering killing themselves? That was how bad I felt.”

Guerrero’s book is out January 24.

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Nick Khan: Vince McMahon Played WWE Hiatus Smart

“Sometimes I think it’s just a three mile radius of LA thing. The ‘Hey, step down and you have to be punished for it’.”

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Nick Khan is now the sole CEO of the WWE after Stephanie McMahon announced her exit from the company. McMahon’s exit followed the news that Vince McMahon would return to oversee the exploration of either a sale or merger of the company.

On the latest episode of The Bill Simmons Podcast, Khan said that even while McMahon was away from WWE, he never considered himself the boss.

“My thought has always been there’s only one boss at WWE and it ain’t me,” he told Simmons. “Vince is the creator and founder of the company. He’s also the controlling shareholder, which as you know, that’s not a work term. That’s a legal term of art. So I think it was always my point of view or Stephanie’s point of view that at some point he would come back. I think the way that he played it was smart, Bill, in that he went away for five or six months — which the audience seems to like that — and then he came back and took control back of his company.”

Vince McMahon exited the WWE power structure five months ago amid multiple allegations of sexual misconduct and the revelation that he used company money to cover up those allegations.

When asked if he is worried that McMahon’s return could turn off business partners or fans, Khan pointed out that so far, that hasn’t happened. He wonders if there is really a strong feeling amongst the public about McMahon being back involved with the company at all.

“Sometimes I think it’s just a three mile radius of LA thing. The ‘Hey, step down and you have to be punished for it’.”

Nick Khan says he made it a point to visit Vince monthly during his hiatus. Those were not business visits. He said that he, Stephanie McMahon, and Triple H had total control during that time.

Bill Simmons pressed Khan, wondering if it bothered McMahon that wrestling fans seemed very happy with the WWE product without his involvement. Simmons reasoned that when anyone builds a creative product for as long as Vince McMahon built the WWE, there is a part of that person that wants to know the product cannot survive without him.

“To me, I never got a sense from him of any sort of bitterness or anything like that,” Khan said. “He seemed, through the first month of his hiatus, thrilled.”

Since Vince McMahon’s return, Nick Khan says he has not expressed any concerns about decisions made in his absence and he has largely still been hands off with the creative side of the business. His sole focus is finding the right business relationship to secure WWE’s future. He added that it is not a responsibility that McMahon is taking on alone.

“I’m involved in it. Triple H is involved in it. The board is obviously involved in it, Triple H being on the board, as I have the good fortune of being as well. We’ll see how it plays out. It should not be a lengthy process.”

Khan did address two rumors floating around Vince McMahon’s return and the power structure of WWE. He said that any rumor that a deal had been done with Saudi Arabia to sell the company was “100 percent fake. 100 percent made up.”

Simmons also asked him about the relationship between Vince and his daughter Stephanie McMahon after she announced her resignation as co-CEO. Khan said that both he and Stephanie always assumed it was likely Vince would return to lead the company. Anything beyond that, he isn’t interested in commenting on.

“It’s important to anyone listening to this, if you’re going to join a family business and you’re not part of the family, stay out of the family business part. That’s rule number one.”

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