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Through Political and Cultural Wars, Whither Sports?

“A grand jury’s decision not to charge officers in Breonna Taylor’s death made sports superfluous again, with the NBA reeling and leagues such as MLB — remember baseball? — fighting for any attention.”

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It’s useless looking beyond tomorrow in sports, much less next week or next month or next year. For all we know, more game boycotts await after officers in Kentucky weren’t charged in the death of Breonna Taylor, who has been the focus of outcry in the NBA Bubble and throughout a racially torn America. All it takes is one LeBron James rage tweet, followed by a storm of protests in his league and others, for activism to shut down the games that ring hollow and trivial.

This is America in late September 2020. Forty days and nights before a hostile presidential election nothing short of unreal, sports is superfluous except when it is political. When the news arrived that only officer Brett Hankison would be charged by a grand jury — on three counts of wanton endangerment after shooting into the homes of Taylor’s neighbors — the NBA’s conference finals shrunk to an afterthought.

Black Lives Matter.

Until they don’t, at least in Louisville.

The verdict led to violence, with two Louisville police officers shot during demonstrations and hospitalized with non-life-threatening injuries. The reaction is what James didn’t want, but he’ll be blamed anyway as his influence in the ongoing conflict grows more significant. Nearing his fourth NBA title, surely the most bizarre and challenging championship any sports legend has won, James sent the Taylor news to his Lakers teammates via a group text. Then he tweeted from his hotel on a campus he can’t leave, which has limited his platform for social change to Zoom interviews and social media posts. He first needed only four words — “JUST SAY HER NAME’’ — along with a video of Aja Monet reciting the original poem of the same title. Then he unleashed a torrent: “I’ve been lost for words today! I’m devastated, hurt, sad, mad! We want Justice for Breonna yet justice was met for her neighbors apartment walls and not her beautiful life. Was I surprised at the verdict. Absolutely not but damnit I was & still am hurt and heavy hearted! I send my love to Breonna mother, family and friends! I’m sorry! I’m sorry! I’m sorry!!’’

This came hours after James, who had called for the officers “who committed that crime’’ to be arrested, said he condemns all violence, including retaliatory attacks against police. “I’ve never in my 35 years ever condoned violence. I do not condone violence towards anyone,’’ he said. “That’s not gonna make this world or America where we want it to be.”

Said teammate Danny Green: “We feel like we’ve taken a step back, that we haven’t made the progress we were seeking. Our voices aren’t being heard loud enough. But we’re not going to stop.’’

It wasn’t what NBA players had in mind when they agreed to play at Disney World. They thought social messages, painted on courts and worn on jerseys and shoes, could help lead to systemic change. But only a trip to Louisville, en masse, would work at this point. And restrictive confinement doesn’t allow for day passes, not when NBA commissioner Adam Silver is hellbent to complete his postseason without a coronavirus outbreak.

“Sadly, there was no justice today for Breonna Taylor,” said Michele Roberts, executive director of the Players Association. “Her killing was the result of a string of callous and careless decisions made with a lack of regard for humanity, ultimately resulting in the death of an innocent and beautiful woman with her entire life ahead of her.’’

Said Warriors coach Steve Kerr, a frequent critic of President Trump and modern-day American life: “It’s just so demoralizing. It’s so discouraging. I just keep thinking about the generation of American kids, of any color, is this the way we want to raise them? Is this the country we want to live in?”

For now, the various quests for championships chug along, financial formalities more than joyful pursuits. The NBA and NHL have remarkably avoided virus disruptions in their respective Bubbles and are trying to award trophies and sneak out before Covid notices. In the NFL, mindless bravado continues to be revealed as naked stupidity, starting with head coaches who don’t wear masks on the sidelines, thinking play calls are more important than the wellness of other human beings. College football keeps force-feeding a disjointed season, oblivious to campuses rocked by Covid. Then we have Major League Baseball. Remember baseball?

The guinea pig sees daylight. It has been a grim and brutal experiment, muddled by dozens of game postponements and many more positive Covid tests than the powers-that-be dare to disclose. But in a few days, somehow, MLB will start its postseason and collect nearly $1 billion from broadcast partners in a distasteful money grab that prioritized — all together now — industry wealth over the health of those in uniform.

It’s no reach to say this is the most important October in the sport’s history. Even before the pandemic, MLB was plunging toward a crippling labor impasse next year, with the warring owners and players doomed to rub each other out. Now, there’s no assurance fans will return to ballparks anytime soon, which will paralyze free agency this winter and create more ill will. The games never been been slower, all foul balls and strikeouts with a home run mixed in to curb yawning, and the human element that made the game real has been algorithmed-out by tech nerds. A shotgun regular season has been a cluster of chaos and attrition, with the abnormal and creepy leading to uncertainty and fatigue, to the point Tampa Bay manager Kevin Cash made a startling confession to ESPN.

“This isn’t fun,’’ said Cash, whose team only has the American League’s best record.

Meaning, the postseason had better be spectacular. Because baseball, largely ignored in autumn as it is, faces competition like never before: renewed tensions over racial injustice and police brutality, news shows focused on a hostile presidential election, an NBA Finals likely to include James and, of course, Covid.

You’d be a fool to assume MLB, or sports in general, has conquered the coronavirus. This remains a silent, stealth antagonist that could strike at any time, in as many waves as it wants, and shut down every pro league and college conference in the land. In a story Trump must love, Jon Gruden and Sean Payton were among five more head coaches fined for violating the league’s policy — and please don’t argue that both men have had Corona and, thus, are immune for the long term. You don’t know that. They don’t know that. Tony Fauci doesn’t know that.

“I’ve had the virus. I’m doing my best. I’m very sensitive about it,’’ Gruden said. “I’m calling plays. I just want to communicate in these situations, and if I get fined, I’ll have to pay the fine.’’

In that his 2-0 Raiders are based in Las Vegas, anyone want to bet Gruden doesn’t wear the mask in Week 3? Being fined $100,000 won’t stop these tunnel-visioned loons in the heat of the moment. Being fined an added $250,000 won’t make their owners blink. Just expectorate, baby. Never mind the message it sends to millions. And never mind that the team doctor issuing Covid advice might be a quack, such as the Chargers’ physician who accidentally punctured Tyrod Taylor’s lung while giving the quarterback a pain-killer injection for cracked ribs.

Then there’s college football. If Touchdown Jesus, the Four Horsemen and the Gipper can’t stop a breakout, I’m not sure why four of the Power Five conferences — please don’t join them, Pac-12 — persist in staging a disjointed season when campuses are bombarded by Covid cases. At least Notre Dame is being responsible in postponing a game until December after 13 players were isolated; if only ruthless factories such as Clemson and LSU were as accountable, with Dabo Swinney and Ed Orgeron remaining oblivious to anything but TV riches and their competitive egos.

But when Silver said he’s “clearly learning a lot from other sports’’ when pondering his league’s uncertain future, which likely won’t involve a Bubble that remarkably has remained Covid-proof, he’s primarily referring to MLB. The chaos of the summer months — outbreaks that sidelined the Marlins and Cardinals, positive tests seemingly every day — has given way to hope that a World Series actually can be completed in late October. Of course, as long as Rob Manfred is commissioner, any plan could go sideways or ass-backwards. But the playoff Bubble once thought beyond Manfred’s acumen is about to happen. Teams that have qualified or remain in contention are in quarantine this week, restricted to an indefinite hotel life until they are eliminated or reach the Series, which starts Oct. 20 in that hallowed baseball hotbed of Arlington, Texas. Even when teams play at home ballparks in the first round, they can’t return to their actual places of residence or wander the streets.

Finally, baseball has figured out what the NBA, NHL, WNBA and Major League Soccer knew long ago: The Bubble life is the only safe and effective sports life during a pandemic, regardless of what the NFL is claiming after just two weeks of a season vulnerable to Covid until February. It doesn’t mean the postseason will finish, especially as Manfred insists on having fans in the stands in Arlington for the National League championship series — yes, an American League ballpark is hosting the NLCS — and at the World Series. Isn’t the commish defeating the purpose of the Bubble by inviting fans into a Texas Bubble? Manfred doesn’t care. He’s an army general now, thinking he has won the battle.

“We are pressing ahead to have fans in Texas,” he told USA Today. “One of the most important things to our game is the presence of fans. Starting down the path of having fans in stadiums, and in a safe and risk-free environment, is very, very important to our game.”

Again, he is prioritizing money over safety. Isn’t there also a competitive issue if, say, many more Dodgers fans travel to Globe Life Field for a World Series than Rays fans? Or many more Dodgers fans than Braves fans in a hypothetical NLCS? The AL playoffs will have no such issues because of California’s restrictions banning large gatherings, assuring more fan-less scenes for the divisional series in San Diego and Los Angeles and the ALCS in San Diego. Isn’t this all a bit, um, uneven? Manfred still doesn’t care. He’s a rebel without a clue, talking like a conquering hero. “The best way to say it is that 2020 presented some really, really difficult challenges for the sport, and I never worked harder to try to meet those challenges,’’ he said. “I do take pride that we’re just a few days away from finishing the (regular) season, an important milestone for the industry.’’

As in, cha-ching!

Not that anyone is concerned about the players who have had Covid or the various spreads to family members and others they’ve infected. We’ve heard nothing about spread data because, hey, the owners are recouping some of their TV money. That has been the only end-game. But first, there is a postseason to get through and protocols to heed in a season with too much evidence of irresponsible behavior by several teams. “It’s 2020. I think the sacrifices will have to continue, and this is a big part of it,’’ said Cardinals reliever and Players Association committee member Andrew Miller, referring to the Bubble. “Players certainly have an appreciation for making sure we do everything we can to have a successful playoff run. That is a big part of what we’re doing this year — get to the playoffs and call it what it is: Get that TV money. Hope that money gets into the game, and we find a way to survive this year that is obviously tough financially.”

If a new playoff system has too many qualifiers — 16, also part of the money grab — at least we have refreshing stories for a change. With the Yankees trying to legally fend off the public release of a 2017 document that allegedly confirms them as electronic sign-stealing cheaters (and why isn’t anyone talking about it?), I’m imagining Fernando Tatis Jr. in the World Series. Or the White Sox, with Jose Abreu and Tim Anderson, winning only their second Fall Classic since throwing one in 1919. You tired of the Yankees, Dodgers, Astros, Cubs and Indians? Me, too.

We’re in the weirdest year of our lives. Why not think weird? I actually might watch weird, such as a World Series between … the Marlins and Rays? After 18 Miami players were infected by a July outbreak, there was thought of sending the Marlins home until next year. After all, weren’t they a minor-league operation anyway? The outbreak led to a shocking breakout and a likely playoff berth. They aren’t getting past the NL’s first round, of course, and they aren’t America’s Team. But they are Pandemic’s Team.

More than ever, it’s important to have fun with sports, or at least try. When we’re actually counting down the days to Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2020, the air might be too heavy to keep enjoying ballgames. But barring boycotts, the games are going on whether we care or not, background noise for an American maelstrom.

BSM Writers

Sports Are Learning To Meet Gen Z Where They Are

“The crux of the issue is that Gen Z is the first generation of kids who are truly free to find their “thing” in a way previous generations never could thanks to modern connectivity.”

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Should sports radio be concerned about where audiences will come from in the future? It is an interesting question that we talk about here a lot. It is also something that the New York Times tackled indirectly last week.

A column from Joe Drape and Ken Belson declared this generation of kids “The eSports Generation” and went on to explain just how disconnected from traditional sports they really are.

An alarmist might ask if this is the beginning of the end of traditional sports leagues. Someone a little more level-headed, like Joe Ovies, may want to dive a little deeper to see what leagues are learning and how they are adapting.

Joe hosts The OG in afternoon drive at 99.9 The Fan in Raleigh. He is always interested in how changes in technology and consumption patterns effect sports and his audience. I saw him tweeting about the New York Times piece last week and asked if he would want to write a little something for us.

Enjoy!

Demetri Ravanos


“Meet your audience where they are.”

How many times have you heard that phrase in the last 5 years from a consultant, manager, or any number of Barrett Media posts as content consumption trends continue to spread out over a variety of platforms? Turns out the same applies for pro sports leagues, who are fearful that an entire generation of fans will be lost and their traditional business model will crater as a result.

The New York Times recently highlighted what sports marketers are doing to win over Generation Z, which typically applies to kids born from 1997 to 2012. The Times hits the usual beats.

There’s a reference to Tyler “Ninja” Blevins, an esports star who is also a traditional sports fan, who the NFL hoped would be a Pied Piper for youth fandom. There are examples of MLB, famously stingy when it came to fans using their content on social media, now working with TikTok influencers. And of course, highlighting the NBA’s wide ranging approach to online engagement and their franchise run NBA 2K esports league. Most of the article was based on a recent SSRS/Luker on Trends report, which conducts regular surveys about sports and society.

The issue for pro sports leagues isn’t that Gen Z kids aren’t “passionate” enough about sports. It’s that Gen Z is more likely to admit they simply don’t like sports.

“Only 23 percent of Generation Z said they were passionate sports fans, compared with the 42 percent of millennials (defined as 26 to 41), 33 percent of Generation X (42 to 57) and 31 percent of baby boomers (57 to 76) who identified themselves as passionate. More striking was that 27 percent of Gen Zers said they disliked sports altogether, compared with just 7 percent of millennials, 5 percent of Gen Xers and 6 percent of boomers.”

The new york times, Jan. 12, 2022

Also factoring into the waning interest in sports from Gen Z is the dramatic decline of youth sports participation. There is a larger discussion to be had about the role of parents and specialization in this decline, but we can address that topic another day. As it relates to pro sports leagues today, the drop in youth participation absolutely impacts the level of interest in kids who might want to watch the best in the world of sports do their thing.

“Participation in youth sports was declining even before Covid-19: In 2018, only 38 percent of children ages 6 to 12 played team sports on a regular basis, down from 45 percent in 2008, according to the Sports & Fitness Industry Association.

In June 2020, the pandemic’s early days, 19 percent of parents with kids in youth sports said their child was not interested in playing sports, according to a survey conducted by The Aspen Institute’s Sports and Society Program. By September 2021, that figure was 28 percent.

On average, children play less than three years in a sport and quit by age 11, according to the survey. Why? Mostly, because it is not fun anymore.”

the New york times, Dec. 19th 2021

The crux of the issue is that Gen Z is the first generation of kids who are truly free to find their “thing” in a way previous generations never could thanks to modern connectivity. Meeting up on the playground or at a friend’s backyard for a pickup game has been replaced with meeting your friends on a Discord server and deciding if you’re going to play Halo or Call or Duty after school.

If you have kids in the age range that I do, none of this should be a surprise. You see it every day and don’t even think twice about it. But if you do stop and think about how frictionless it has become to be online all day with your friends, you start to realize the impact of never being bored or getting dragged to things by your parent because there were no other options.

Watching sports and going to sporting events isn’t frictionless. It’s a pain in the ass. Older generations deal with it because we don’t know any better, it’s just what we do. But Gen Z isn’t about to stop what they’re doing just to watch a game. Why would they? They can get the highlights later.

Gen Z is about dropping in and out of entertainment options whenever they feel like it. In other words, why would they sit around waiting for their favorite song to be played on the radio when they can easily pull it up on YouTube or Spotify.

Pro sports leagues can create all the social content and tout billions of views. They can tout engagement with Gen Z because a bunch of kids bought NFL related skins in Fortnite.

Awareness of their leagues isn’t the problem. It’s getting Gen Z to care enough to watch the game. Take my kids, who are fully aware of what’s going on in the world of sports, but getting them to sit down and actually watch the game is torture. Throw in the increasing cost to attend sporting events, I’ve started leaving them at home because it’s a waste of money given my 13-year-old is just gonna play Clash Royale in that $75 seat.

To be clear — I’m OK with my kids just not being into sports. It’s not like I didn’t try. It’s simply understanding we’ve transitioned to a world of niche communities. You can still thrive within those niche communities. Just look at sports talk radio as an example, where you’re not winning with cume, but with passion around sports. That’s what great sports talk radio stations sell. Pro sports leagues will be fine doing the same.

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BSM Writers

How Soon Is Too Soon To Lean Into The NFL Draft?

“I think there will be even more hype and content leading up to Draft than last year.”

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Las Vegas Raiders

For sports talk hosts, nothing generates content quite like the NFL Playoffs. The country’s most popular sport inches closer each week to crowning a champion. Each game produces an unlikely hero, a questionable call or some other storyline that can generate an entire show’s worth of conversation. Around the country, most stations talking about football are talking about the playoffs.

There is a select group of markets though where it makes sense for the football conversation to be driven by something else. Sure, the playoffs are on the radar, but if you are in a market with a top five draft pick, it makes sense that prospects and potential trades will draw significant interest.

Houston is not completely ignoring the playoffs. Landry Locker, co-host of In The Loop on Sports Radio 610 says that just like everywhere else in the country, NFL football is the headliner.

“We cover the NFL Playoffs top-to-bottom whether the Texans are in or not,” he told me. “However, just like all of our content we try to localize it as much as possible and try to respect the fact that we are a local show. Why do Houstonians care about what happened in each Wild Card game? What are the local ties?”

And what about the NFL Draft? The Texans have the third pick. That means there are plenty of discussions worth having on air, especially with the local team being so quarterback-needy.

I asked Landry if the lack of a Trevor Lawrence or Joe Burrow has dulled interest in the draft for Texans fans compared to what it could have been.

“I think there will be even more hype and content leading up to Draft than last year. While this QB class isn’t as good as last year’s the speculation about Russell Wilson, Aaron Rodgers and Deshaun Watson make up for that void because if any of those three are traded it will likely be before the Draft. The NFL offseason has become the most active in sports and this year’s will be as wild as ever, especially here in Houston with the Watson drama.”

Ryan Green, better known to Jacksonville sports fans as Hacker on 1010XL, is in a familiar position. Just last year, he and his colleagues on XL Primetime were talking about the Jaguars welcoming a new coach to town and holding the first pick in the draft. By the time the NFL Draft gets here in April, the Jaguars will be holding the first pick as they welcome a new coach to town. So how does Hacker ensure that this year’s conversations don’t sound like 2021’s conversations on air?

“We will discuss what went wrong last year and how not to duplicate that this time around,” he said. “Why did last year fail? What could have been done differently and what needs to be different this time around. Also the history of back-to-back No. 1 picks for teams isn’t good, how can the Jaguars succeed when so many others have failed.”

Having the first pick of draft is great when you have the chance to grab the quarterback that can change your franchise’s fortunes. But the Jaguars experienced that last year and they have the top pick again.

Hacker said it perfectly. Last year was a failure for the Jaguars. Does that make his listeners a little less enthusiastic this time around?

Yes, he says. Last year was such a let down that there is a whole series of conversations fans want to have before they are ready to start breaking down prospects.

“Jaguar fans want the coaching and gm hires to be correct or the picks won’t matter anyway. Coaching matters and the Jaguar fans have had to endure a lot of bad coaching over the past decade. They want the right coach, then they will focus on the top pick”

Draft talk is fun. As Brandon Kravitz pointed out in his column earlier this week, it is a chance for fans of bad teams to feel real hope. Hope is the word right now in Houston too.

Locker says that there are so many factors that make this offseason one that Texans fans have been waiting three years for. His plan is to devote as much time to draft talk as possible.

“Obviously that’s fluid depending on what happens with the Stros and Rockets,” he says, “but this is going to be the wildest offseason in Texans franchise history. This will be the first time the Texans have had a first round selection in three drafts and with the possibility of getting even more compensation for Watson and a new coach it’s going to be nuts around here.”

It seems weird to type this, but Jacksonvillians know it is true. Hope can get old sometimes. When it is all you have ever been served, hope just doesn’t hit the same.

Hacker jokes that he and his co-workers know their way around a show rundown this time of year because this time of year never seems to end for the Jags.

“Draft talk for Jacksonville always starts around Thanksgiving, so we are already a month into draft talk before the playoffs even get here.”

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BSM Writers

Your Only Focus Should Be On What You Can Control

“We can’t press a Staples easy button and automatically make the audience more active, the sales team more diligent, or the editors gather every piece of sound.”

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Behavior Gap

The crybaby Cowboys are at it again. After Dallas lost its Wild Card playoff game to the San Francisco 49ers 23-17 on Sunday, there was plenty of blame and finger pointing. Big D’s fingers weren’t pointed at themselves and their ugly run defense, shaky quarterback play, and inability to avoid committing stupid penalties, right?

No no, it’s far easier to just blame the officials. Let’s shine a light on those guys instead!

The controversy occurred at the very end of the game. As the Cowboys trailed by six points with 14 seconds remaining, quarterback Dak Prescott rushed up the middle of the field for 17 yards. As Chris Berman would say, “Tick, tick tick tick tick.” Precious seconds were ticking away as umpire Ramon George rushed over to spot the football. Once Prescott spiked the ball to stop the clock, the final seconds had ticked away and the Cowboys lost the game.

Prescott said in his postgame press conference that the official “needs to be closer to the ball” to spot it more quickly, and the result of that not happening was “tough to accept.” When asked about fans throwing beer bottles and trash at the officiating crew, Prescott said, “Credit to them then. Credit to them.”

Wow, dude. Really? Hooray for assault? Cowboys head coach Mike McCarthy chimed in by saying, “We shouldn’t have had any problem getting the ball spotted there.”

This might be news to the Cowboys, but not every NFL official is going to have blazing speed mixed with the agility of a ballet dancer. The offense needs to allow enough time just in case the umpire doesn’t resemble a Cirque du Soleil performer. The Cowboys failed to do that.

The Cowboys also made a huge mistake in the final two minutes. Defensive end Randy Gregory drew a defensive holding penalty for bear hugging and tackling a 49ers offensive lineman. That stupid penalty directly impacted the limited time the Cowboys had at the end of the game. Prescott also had an awful 69.3 passer rating. For context, Dak’s 69.3 passer rating against the Niners was actually lower than the abysmal 69.7 passer rating New York Jets rookie quarterback Zach Wilson produced this season. Yuck.

But it’s someone else’s fault. Right, Cowboys? That’s what losers do; they point the finger at others.

For the Cowboys to make the loss about the officials is flat-out embarrassing. They spent more time whining about things they can’t control (officiating) compared to what they can control (their own performance).

The same thing happens in sports radio. A lot. Many people in the industry are consumed by what they can’t control rather than what they can. Several hosts focus on the time slot they want or the job they think they should have. News flash: that isn’t controllable. It’s also easy to complain about a lack of advertisers or sponsors, why listener engagement isn’t better with more calls and tweets, or why some postgame sound is missing on the cut sheet.

“We don’t have the sound? How do we not have the sound? Everybody else has it. How are we missing the same sound that all of the other shows have?”

MacGyver it, dude. Find another way. Focus on what you can control instead of what you can’t. As Patriots head coach Bill Belichick says, “Do your job.”

The truth is that there are a lot of things in sports radio that workers want to control, might even think they should control, but don’t actually dictate. We can’t press a Staples easy button and automatically make the audience more active, the sales team more diligent, or the editors gather every piece of sound. But we can focus our attention on many things we do have control over.

Former NFL head coach Jon Gruden once gave some great advice. Before he was known for his emailing ways, Gruden hosted the successful QB camp series on ESPN. I’ll never forget an episode with former Miami Hurricanes quarterback Brad Kaaya. The QB told Gruden, “It’s tough when each week you’re thinking, ‘Man, if I don’t play well, if I don’t throw for this many yards, if we don’t win, my coach might not be here the very next week.’ It’s tough on me ‘cause you spend time around these coaches, you meet the families, meet the kids, coach [Al] Golden recruited me. You grow close to him.”

Gruden stopped Kaaya and said, “Make this note here; worry about what you can control. Don’t worry about the things you can’t control. Because if you do start worrying about things that are out of your control, you’re going to become a freakin’ basket case like me.”

I love this advice. It’s so easy to get off track by focusing our energy in the wrong areas. The funny thing is that our thoughts might start in a good place but lead to a bad outcome. Kaaya was worried about his coach’s job status and family. That’s reasonable, but by doing so it added unnecessary pressure to the situation and shifted the QB’s focus to things he can’t control. That isn’t a good result.

I think it’s smart to constantly be aware of whether something is helping or hurting your ability to perform.

A lot of people in the sports radio industry are competitive maniacs. That isn’t automatically a bad thing at all. Being super competitive can fuel a great work ethic and provide a valuable edge. However, it can evolve into a roadblock once you become a bitter, competitive maniac. That’s a different story. The bitter competitive maniac becomes jaded, frustrated, and hung up on what other people have. How is any of that helpful? It’s much better to stay focused on things that help you do a good job, not get in the way of it happening.

The Cowboys couldn’t control whether the official spotted the ball faster or not, but they could’ve allowed more time in case the umpire wasn’t Usain Bolt 2.0. They had plenty of control over surrendering fewer than 169 yards rushing to San Fran and Prescott having a much better day. But the crybaby Cowboys will whine and whine instead of being more accountable.

Don’t be like them. Instead of focusing on what you can’t control, take a closer look at what you actually can control.

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